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Friday, May 09, 2014

PANAMA CITY— After nearly three weeks of trial culminating in about nine hours of deliberation, jurors convicted three former leaders for their roles in a fraudulent loan that cost the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation millions. Terry Dubose, 66, of Panama City Beach , was convicted of all 12 counts with which he was charged. Elwood “Woody” West, 40, of Monroeville , Ala. , was acquitted on the conspiracy count and convicted of the 11 other counts. Dubose was the president and CEO of Coastal Community Investments, a holding company that owned Panama City Beach-based Coastal Community Bank.


Attorney Frank Baker, 62, of Marianna, (ON L. IN PHOTOS ABOVE), was Coastal’s attorney and a member of its board of directors. He was convicted on eight counts and acquitted on three counts of wire fraud and one count of making a false statement to the FDIC. All three men could each be sentenced to up to 30 years in prison and could have to forfeit property as a result of their convictions. Judge Richard Smoak scheduled a sentencing hearing for all three men July 17. They are free on bond until then. A felony conviction disqualifies someone from being a member of the Florida Bar, so the Jackson County Board of County Commissioners will have to find a replacement for Frank Baker, who has served as county attorney even since his indictment.


WHAT ELSE ARE THEY HIDING IN MARIANNA FL AT DOZIER SCHOOL FOR BOYS, ANOTHER CONSPIRACY? FBI: Frank Baker The Attorney Hired By Jackson County to Stop the Dig for Bodies At Dozier School for Boys Marianna Fl Indicted By DOJ on Bank Fraud Charges. Jackson County Commissioners had appointed local historian Dale Cox to help county attorney Frank Baker as he represents the county’s interests in court as Circuit Judge Bill Wright decides whether to allow the exhumation of human remains on the campus of the old Dozier School for Boys.

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The appointment of Dale Cox as an assistant to Frank Baker, photo above, came at a county commission meeting, just after Dale Cox had presented the county board with several requests for action that would support his individual opposition to the exhumation. The disinterment is being called for in part because questions linger about how many people are buried there, and about who is buried where. The graves are unmarked by name and there are areas near the cemetery and perhaps elsewhere on the campus where a University of South Florida research team suspects that unmarked and long-forgotten graves are located.

   Bill Warner Private Investigator Sarasota Fl at www.wbipi.com

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